Call for proposals extended – October 6th

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North Carolina Service-Learning Summit “Civic Engagement Through Service-Learning” Call for Proposals

The North Carolina Service-Learning Coalition (NCSLC) requests workshop proposals and showcase presentations for the 2017 NC Statewide Service-Learning Summit to be held Thursday, November 16, 2017 at UNC-Pembroke. All Proposals must be received no later than Friday, October 6th, 2017. All workshop presenters and showcase providers must register for the summit at https://tinyurl.com/NCSLC2017. We will inform all presenters and showcases by October 10, 2017.

We encourage your submissions via our Google form:
https://tinyurl.com/y9nepqht

Registration for the 2017 NCSLC Summit is now open!

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The North Carolina Service-Learning Coalition is pleased to announce that registration for our 2017 North Carolina Service-Learning Summit is now OPEN!

This year’s Summit is organized around the theme of “Civic Engagement Through Service-Learning” and students, service-learning professionals, and community organizations across the state will gather and share their best practices.

This year, the National Youth Leadership Council (NYLC) has partnered with NCSLC to be featured with keynote and breakout sessions.

Registration is open at this link: https://tinyurl.com/NCSLC2017

What works in service-learning?

What works in service-learningA new white paper from Projects That Work at Catholic University seeks to identify “what works” in service-learning projects in middle and high schools across the country by examining what happens, how well it happens, and what factors inhibit or optimize it happening.

In Wave 1 of the research, researchers made several observations about effective service-learning projects:

  • Projects were more feasible when an adult from a community partner was involved with the project.  Students who worked with community partners also felt that they learned more and made a bigger difference in their communities.
  • Projects went more smoothly when teachers provided specific information for students about project implementation.
  • Projects that were closely aligned to academic standards led to greater student learning but were more difficult to implement
  • Students felt they learned more from projects that involved reflection activities like related readings, class discussions, and opportunities to demonstrate the project’s impact

What recommendations would you add from your own experience?  Let us know in the comments.

The entire Wave 1 white paper is available from Projects that Work.  You can read an interview with Dr. Edward Metz, lead researcher for Projects that Work, and find about about how to get involved in the study, in this article from Youth Service America.  

Featured Service Story: William Peace University Hosts Day of Service

Chris Baker, AmeriCorps/Vista Volunteer Coordinator at William Peace University in Raleigh, NC, contributed our service-learning story this week:

We recently had a very successful day of service here at William Peace University.  Over 123 students, staff, and alumni worked on 4 different projects. We also packaged meals for Stop Hunger Now, which have just recently been sent to Nicaragua.

In planning the event, one of the most critical lessons I learned was to communicate, communicate, communicate, and when you think you’ve communicated enough, communicate more. We sent out emails to participants daily leading up to the event reminding them of the basic information, and where they would be serving.  On the day of the event, if there was a question about where someone was, or what time something start, we could always have the person revert back to their emails.

Overall, our day of service impacted Raleigh directly in a very limited way. Our students only served so many meals at Oak City Outreach Center, or sorted a fraction of the clothes at North Raleigh Ministry’s Thrift Shop. We took 26 no sew blankets to Project Linus, but that only scratches the surface of what they need. However,  these actions were helpful though in two major ways. The first is that it opened the door between William Peace University, and our partner organizations.  Establishing relationship with organizations leads to great work with them, and even other organizations by association.  Secondly, it opened our students to service work as a whole.  Many of our students are familiar with service work, or maybe have participated in days of service before. Still, they experienced something unique that particular day at that particular site. Perhaps a spark was lit and smolders into a fire within that person to make service their life’s work?

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For more information about this event, contact Chris at clbaker@peace.edu.

Do you have a service-learning story you’d like to share?  Send it our way: ncservicelearningcoalition@gmail.com.

Pictures and video are property of William Peace University.

Beyond NC: Serving and Learning in Uganda

In the remote village of Kisoro in Uganda, NC Service-Learning Coalition members reach out to support education and literacy.

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NCSLC Board member Thomas Ray and his daughter, Chloe, visited the village of Kisoro.  Kisoro lies on the western border of Uganda and Rwanda, where refugees from Rwanda and local villagers struggle to overcome the effects of war and poverty.

Chloe is spending a whole year teaching local children and serving the community.  The father-and-daughter team also brought two Kindle libraries, each containing more than 1300 e-books, including books in local languages.

The e-books are specifically reviewed and selected with local children in mind as part of a service project, 1KL (www.1KL.org), founded by another board member of our own, Sam Park.

Sam founded the project to send more than 32,925 e-books to 10 countries as well as numerous schools and communities in the U.S., so children can read and learn.